Current Winners

Undergraduate Merit Scholarship

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Cross Cultural Examination of Emotion Regulation
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Psychology
My research project hopes to determine whether there are differences between Western and Eastern cultures with regard to emotion regulation. I intend to study participants in the U.S. and Japan to analyze how emotion regulation strategies (suppression and reappraisal) impact physiological measurements. Additionally, I hope to better understand the relationship between emotion regulation and psychopathology, within a culture specific context. It has been shown that different emotion regulation strategies are associated with varying degrees of anxiety and depression, depending on one's culture...Read more
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The Separating Sword and the Léignid Becc: Celtic Analogues of the Tristan Legend
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
English
Despite the Arthurian Tristan legend’s later, more popular French adaptations, it is widely accepted that the legend’s origins lie in Celtic literature. Many motifs central to the Tristan story can be found in similar early Celtic heroic narratives, but to what degree scholars can trust Irish and Welsh manuscript evidence is a question that has troubled the firm situating of several motifs of the Tristan legend in Celtic culture. Since most of our surviving Celtic material comes down to us in quite late exemplars, dating the Celtic origin of the Tristan motifs has become an incredibly...Read more
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Counterterrorism in France and the United States in the Post-9/11 Era: Divergence by Design or Curious Convergence?
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Political Science
How do France and the United States – two states facing a similar terrorist threat but which have different national, institutional, and legal traditions – respond to terrorism in the post-9/11 era? Given their opposite positions on the statist-limited government spectrum, their varying legal systems, and diverging attitudes toward separation of powers and interest group influence, we might reasonably expect the timing, character, and level of repressiveness of the French and U.S. responses to differ significantly. However, facing a similar and globalized threat, a similar response in both...Read more
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Citizen Science GIS: Collaborating with Communities to Investigate Marine Debris in Hopkins, Belize
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Public Health & Integrative Biology
Marine debris is a growing global problem that poses health and safety hazards for humans and animals. Efforts to manage marine debris include citizen science and beach clean ups. Furthermore, participatory GIS (PGIS) has been used extensively to identify potential sites with problems and to influence conservation management in terrestrial areas, however, it has rarely been used in marine environments. PGIS provides spatial data from the community that is often excluded in ecological studies. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to include local knowledge from community members along with...Read more
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The Handmaiden: Transnational Feminist Politics in Korean Cinema
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Gender & Women's Studies
Western social progressivism is a dominant global myth that upholds “the West” as beacons of women’s rights, queer rights, etc., while “the rest” are consigned as “traditional” and “oppressive.” Hollywood and Western media’s saturation of the global market perpetuates this myth, and Western academia institutes it as fact by paying attention only to Hollywood films in labors of analysis. However, economic shifts of the past few decades have seen to the rise of films by non-Western creators about non-Western stories. My research will be on the cultural effects of one of these films— Park Chan-...Read more
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Roman Amphorae of North Africa: Markers of a Pan-Mediterranean Economy
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Anthropology and Classics
My research intends to study the relationship between Rome and its provincial holdings in North Africa in the Third Century (AD 235-284) using the archaeological record. I focus my research on the study of Roman trade amphoras, ceramic vessels used to transport grain, oil, and wine. My research focuses on amphoras originating from North Africa, specifically those of Tunisian origin. My work is hoping to better understand the geographical location of production sites of these trade vessels. The results of this project intend to highlight the role played by specific regions with Roman North...Read more
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Revolutionary Ideas
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Anthropology
My project is an exploration of generational disparities in today’s Cuba, as fostered under the Castros’ Regime that is now entering its aftermath. It will focus on one of Havana’s neighborhoods: Luyanó. Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the international isolation in which the country found itself, the economic collapse, and the ruinous consequences of the sanctions, the Cuban government has struggled to keep patriotic sentiments and revolutionary ideals alive in its people. This reality is embodied in the subjective stance of young adults of my generation (those born in the 1990s), an...Read more
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Will war in Syria lead to crisis in Jordan? Refugees' impact on Jordan's labor market
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Economics, Arabic
With a reported 1.3 million Syrian refugees currently living in Jordan, the Jordanian government faces major challenges in its efforts to maintain political and economic stability. An area of special concern is the country’s labor market. Economic theory, anecdotal evidence, and Jordanian public opinion suggest that Syrian refugees working illegally could undercut Jordanians in low-skill sectors by accepting lower wages and working longer hours. Recent international aid efforts have sought to counter this trend by directing funds toward increasing employment for both Syrian refugees and...Read more
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Water Sanitation and Empowerment in Gbleme, Ghana
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Society and Environment
In rural Ghana, inaccessibility to water sanitation infrastructure holds considerable implications with regards to gender relations and equity. For instance, the high incidence of contact with and utilization of contaminated water make women significantly more susceptible to diseases such as viral hepatitis, cholera, typhoid fever, and malaria. 1 The UNDP’s 2006 Human Development Report asserts, “…the people suffering the most from the water and sanitation crisis - poor people in general and poor women in particular - often lack the political voice needs dot assert their claims to water” (...Read more
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NGOs, Gender Dimensions, and Grievance Mechanisms in Jordan
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Political Science
Jordan’s refugee crisis, particularly among the Syrian refugee population, has a striking gender dimension, with women constituting a majority of adult refugees, heading 40% of refugee households, an unusually high figure for the region. Many humanitarian non-governmental organizations (NGOs) either focus specifically on women or include activities to support women’s empowerment. But NGO activities in Jordan are not always successful, particularly in relation to promoting gender equality. One possible solution lies in the integration of grievance mechanisms to NGO activities. Originally...Read more
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The Other Within: Homophobic Nationalism in Russia and Gay Narratives in Russian Literature
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Comparative Literature
The positioning of Russia vis-à-vis the West has long been a balancing act between a desired narrative of Russian cultural belonging and the existence of an antiheroic Other within Russian society. The scapegoating of Jews in the campaign against cosmopolitanism ( bor’ba s kosmopolitizmom) , triggered by a fear of capitalist surrounders ( kapitalisticheskoe okruzhenie ), is one such example from the late Stalin era. The shaving of the beards in Peter the Great’s time, however, is an example from a moment in which this Other was actually a representative of Russian tradition. Today, LGBT...Read more
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Feminist K-pop Fans and their Connective Action on Twitter
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Media Studies
The past two years have been a time of painful awakening for Korea as the country witnessed a deeply polemic gender war previously unprecedented in Korean society. Within K-pop fandom, a series of fan-initiated hashtags such as #WeWantBTSFeedback has started publicizing and demanding feedback for issues of misogyny in K-pop industry and idol star texts. In this research, I will explore how the recent feminism revival in Korea has fostered a discourse on identity politics within K-pop fandom by examining the feminist narrative of the 21st century Korea, history, and characteristics of K-pop...Read more
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Looking at the Role of Japanese Bureaucracy through Immigration Control Policy
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Political Science
Enough rationale is provided for the ideal bureaucracy to enact an effective and comprehensive immigration control policy in Japan. The country is currently facing a rapid decline of labor population and rapid aging. In 2000, the United Nations Development Program released a report strongly advising the country to accept a large amount of immigrants in the coming decades to compensate for domestic labor shortage. Whereas the ideology of ethnic homogeneity, national identity, and lack of precedent continue to obstruct reform, there has been isolated cases of liberalization that cannot be...Read more
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Political Economy of Nativism: Evidence from the Great Irish Famine and the Know-Nothing Party
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Mathematics
My project studies the relationship between international migration flows and the rise of radical nationalism. The Great Famine in Ireland 1845-52 caused an unprecedented surge in immigration to the United States---1.2 million Irish, approximately 5% of the U.S. population, arrived during the famine years. Immediately afterward, the anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic Know-Nothing party gained widespread support, garnering 51 out of 234 seats in the 1854 congressional election. I exploit the Great Famine in Ireland as a natural experiment to estimate the effect of immigration on the rise of the...Read more
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The Impacts of Climate Change Mitigation Policies on Migratory Patterns in Eastern Honduras
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
Peace and Conflict Studies
Despite rapid urban growth, 44 percent of Hondurans remain rural campesinos (peasants).[ 1] Over the past decade, climate change has posed severe challenges to vulnerable communities that depend on traditional weather patterns for planting and cultivation. Abnormal weather, long droughts, heavier and inconsistent rainfall, infertile soil, and the intensity of wind and storms have reduced crop yields or uprooting what little crops have been planted.[2] Numerous organisations, scholars, institutions, and activists[3] have been avidly studying the causes and direct impacts of climate change on...Read more

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