Current Winners

Pre-Dissertation Research Grant

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Foreign Rebels and Native Friends: European Rivalries and the Scramble for the Amazonian Borderlands, 1601-1684
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
History
In the seventeenth century, settlers from multiple and largely rival European polities, most notably the Dutch, the English, the French, the Portuguese and the Spanish, all scrambled to establish settlements in the Lower Amazon, a space that the Iberian Union claimed but had little authority over. The early decades of the century saw the establishment of multiple satellite colonies in what is now Northern Brazil, settlements that relied heavily on indigenous alliances and indigenous slavery. At the same time, the seventeenth century was also a period of near-constant European warfare that...Read more
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Instrumental Adversaries: Steamships, Agents, and the Political-Economy of Emigration in Western Europe, 1870-1930
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
History
Between the 1840s and the 1940s, nearly 70 million paying customers departed Europe’s shores, meaning that for decades emigrants themselves were the region’s leading export. Though such extraordinary levels of mobility have long been taken for granted as the natural consequence of European overpopulation and the economic development of the Americas, my research suggests that migratory flows were powerfully shaped by the colossal European shipping industry. Never unopposed, however, shipping cartels squared off against agrarian capitalists desperate to arrest the flight off the land as well as...Read more
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College Athletes in a Trans-Atlantic Perspective: Rethinking Athletic Protest as Labor Protest at Marquette University
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
History
From the mid-1960s to early 1970s, college athletic programs experienced a revolution from their black athletes that transformed how athletes were recruited, treated on campus, and compensated. These black athletes protested, and universities treated these athletes as laborers on strike, not students protesting unsuitable conditions. My dissertation project will analyze protests by college athletes in the context of both labor protests in colonial spaces and student protests in university spaces. Contemporary accounts lack a historical and transnational perspective and my dissertation uses...Read more
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The Treatment and Control of Chronic Disease in Chile
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Public Health
Half of the years of life lost in Latin America are attributable to chronic diseases. In Chile, despite a universal healthcare system and free medication for hypertension and diabetes, less than half of diagnosed patients have their disease under control. In a public healthcare system without fees it can be challenging to ensure patients appear for their scheduled appointments. In an attempt to improve appointment attendance, and ideally health, the ministry of health scaled-up an SMS appointment reminder program to all public primary care clinics in the country in 2015. My research this...Read more
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Networks of elusion: substitution of tax evasion services among fiscal havens
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Economics
At the onset of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, the Ecuadorian government ratified a tax on all currency outflows (Impuesto a la Salida de Divisas, ISD). Novel data infrastructure constructed to accompany the tax allows researchers to view the universe of foreign transactions involving Ecuadorian entities, including transaction amounts, method and purpose of transaction, and locations of both parties, among other information. Given variation in the tax penalty for transactions involving entities located in tax havens as well as in the Ecuadorian government's list of recognized tax havens, I...Read more
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Engineering the Border: Islands of Containment and Mobility in Bangladesh
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Anthropology
My research focuses on contemporary border regimes in Bangladesh. I investigate the way that borders proliferate in a number of situations in order to govern people and engineer spaces in a multitude of ways. Currently, my research focuses on two specific sites. First is the ongoing project of the Bangladeshi government and Chinese and British engineering firms to turn Bhasan Char - a small silt island in the Bay of Bengal - into a refugee camp island capable of housing hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims fleeing the genocide in Myanmar. I am interested in the conceptions of...Read more
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H.C. Andersen and Language-in-Use
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Scandinavian Studies
I plan to spend this summer at the Hans Christian Andersen Center in Odense, Denmark researching the revision process in Andersen’s early drafts through the lens of linguistic anthropology. Specifically, I am interested in how his texts investigate themselves as both products of and participants in larger socio-linguistic processes. In his native Danish tongue, Andersen was a remarkable innovator of language whose narrative modes deftly maneuver between the literary and oral, formal and vernacular, adult and childlike, human and nonhuman. Andersen’s writing was much at odds with the literary...Read more
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An investigation of the causes underlying the relative abundance of four Oenocarpus (Arecaceae) palms in Iquitos, Peru
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Integrative Biology
The Amazon basin is the most biodiverse region in the world, harboring an estimated 16,000 total tree species. However, the densities at which these species are found varies drastically. While most species are rare, a small percentage (~2.5%) of them are considered hyperdominant. Interestingly, many palm trees, which are economically and culturally important to the region, are amongst these hyperdominant trees. What traits are involved in allowing some palms to become dominant or stay rare? Could past human selection and dispersal of nutritious and important species have shaped the abundance...Read more
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Sovereignty and Kingship Between Empires: A Bottom-up study of Eighteenth-Century India
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
History
In I707, following the death of the last powerful Mughal emperor Awrangzīb, most of the subcontinent came under the sway of powerful regional successor states. Almost coterminous with Awrangzīb’s death, several supra-local Rajput little kingdoms (previously landlords under the Mughals) sprang up in a central Indian Mughal province, Malwa. An internal frontier for North India based Mughal empire; it would become a bone of contention and the main theatre of multifaceted conflicts that unfolded in the first half of the eighteenth century between two early modern empires — Mughal and Maratha. In...Read more
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Bridging the Gap: a historical ecology approach to human practices in Darién, Panama
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Anthropology
The Gran Darién region of Panama is the sole land bridge connecting North, Central and South America and has thus been integral to human mobility from pre-Hispanic times through the present. However, no formal archaeological work has been conducted here, despite hosting the earliest Spanish settlement in mainland America as well as a diverse contemporary population, which includes multiple indigenous groups, Afro-descendants, and campesinos . This summer, in collaboration with an ecological team from the Universidad Tecnol ógica de Panamá and the Panamanian film collective ACAMPADOC, I will...Read more
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Perception of acoustic cues in coronal stops of Spanish-English bilinguals
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Spanish and Portuguese
Spanish and English share many characteristics in areas such as phonology, morphology, and syntax, but they also differ in many others. The production of coronal consonants (i.e, the sounds /t d/) are a perfect example. Both languages have these sounds, but while in Spanish these sounds are characterized as having a dental articulation, in English their constriction is reported to be alveolar . In previous research, I have found that bilingual speakers seem to produce the sounds with two different places of articulation—one for each language—instead of having one shared articulatory gesture...Read more
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(1) Municipal Populism in Moscow (2) State-Led Democratization in the Russian Empire
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Political Science
Over the summer of 2019, I will be improving my Russian language skills at the Derzhavin Institute, conducting interviews and a survey of municipal deputies in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and collecting archival data in the Russian State Historical Archive and the the State Archive of the Russian Federation. This research agenda is aimed at the completion of two ongoing projects to be presented at APSA (September, 2019) and ASEEES (November, 2019). The first is entitled "Municipal Populism in Moscow: Local Challenges to Single-Party Dominant Regimes" that examines the recruitment and campaign...Read more
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Electricity Resource Sharing in Micro-Grids for Energy Access
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Energy & Resources Group
Jonathan is studying solar electricity resource governance in community-scale micro-grids in East Africa, evaluating the capacity of new Peer-to-Peer energy trading to address the problem of energy poverty. In Summer 2019, he is visiting candidate sites for an electricity intervention and conducting baseline surveys. Jonathan's work applies power systems engineering, economics, and development theory to designing and implementing electricity infrastructure.Read more
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Afro-Chileans, Black Immigrants and the Negotiation of Racial and National Identities in Chile's northern frontier
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Sociology
Research on immigration and race has generally considered race as one of the main variables to explain differences in assimilation trajectories between immigrant groups. Nevertheless, most of these studies take the race variable for granted, as if the meanings assigned to racial categories were univocal and the determination of who falls under any racial category was unambiguous and shared by everybody. But if race is a crucial variable to explain integration processes, it is important to identify the mechanisms by which racial categories are defined. Understanding race not as a set of pre-...Read more
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Exploring the Drivers of Civil Society Partisanship in Thailand
Term:
Summer 2019
Department:
Political Science
When do pro-democracy civil society groups choose to collaborate with political parties? In authoritarian contexts, these actors are, in theory, natural allies of opposition politicians, who share similar goals to rein in regime abuses and promote multiparty democracy. In practice, however, the emergence of such alliances is far from guaranteed. While some civil society actors do, indeed, throw their lot in with the opposition, others work assiduously to maintain a neutral, non-partisan position in their work. What explains this variation? My research explores this question in the context of...Read more

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