Current Winners

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Gender and the Trans-Pacific World

Gender and the Trans-Pacific World , organized by Weihong Bao (Film and Media, and East Asian Languages and Cultures), Catherine Ceniza Choy (Ethnic Studies), SanSan Kwan (Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies), and Laura Nelson (Gender and Women’s Studies), explores the significance of gender and “Pacific World” frameworks to understand the connections between the lands, people, cultures, and...+ Read more
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Examining the Global Reach of Algorithms

E xamining the Global Reach of Algorithms is an interdisciplinary working group led by Massimo Mazzotti (History), David Bates (Rhetoric), Caitlin Rosenthal (History), Jenna Burrell (Information Science), Morgan Ames (CSTMS), and Gretchen Gano (CSTMS). We explore the increasingly important and multifaceted roles that algorithms play in politics, media, science, organizations, culture, and the...+ Read more
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Understanding the Cause(s) of the Last Mass Extinction at the Cretaceou-Paleogene Boundary

Organized by Paul Renne (Earth and Planetary Science), Mark Richards (Earth and Planetary Science), Charles Marshall (Integrative Biology), Seth Finnegan (Integrative Biology), and William Clemens (Integrative Biology), this project aims to chart a course to resolving the decades-old conundrum of why the dinosaurs and myriad other fauna and flora met extinction sixty-six million years ago. This...+ Read more
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Mapping the Human Right to Water

Charlotte Smith (School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences), Charisma Acey (Department of City and Regional Planning), Isha Ray (College of Natural Resources, Energy and Resources Group), and Helene Silverberg (Political Science), are exploring access to water and sanitation as a human right. This right means that everyone, without discrimination, should have access to adequate...+ Read more
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The colonial history of the Amazon Forest
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Spanish
The early modern period supposed the expansion of the European empires in a global scale. With this idea in mind, in my future dissertation, I plan to study the process of the conquest and colonization of the Amazon Forest during the period of the European expansion in America. Related to this conquest, one aspect that catches my attention is the formation of borders between the kingdoms of Spain and Portugal in the Amazonian area. These borders were established very late in the eighteen century through the “Treaty of San Ildefonso” in 1777. The reason for this treaty, among others, was that...Read more
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Term:
AY 2016-17
Department:
Film & Media
Fareed Ben-Youssef is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Film and Media at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his BA in English Literature with a Film Concentration from Princeton University and his master’s degree in the Film Studies Program in the department of Rhetoric at Berkeley. His dissertation, Visions of Power: Violence, the Law, and the Post-9/11 Genre Film , is concerned with specific moments where genre films (the Western, Film noir, and the Superhero film) disrupt a public discourse shaped by Manichean divisions. His conclusion examines international genre...Read more
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The Global Networks of Oocyte Cryopreservation
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Anthropology
Until 2012 oocyte cryopreservation (human egg freezing) was an unregulated scientific endeavor. Following the American Society for Reproductive Medicine’s lift on the experimental label, the global egg trade was made complicated by ‘fertility preservation’-- commercial egg storage for those willing to pay to postpone pregnancy. Global transactions of human eggs take multiple forms: in women who donate/sell their eggs for research, for prospective mothers, traveler women who sell or are trafficked to infertile reproductive tourists, and now, in the eugenic underbelly of companies selling ‘...Read more
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The Pleasure Principle: Knowledge, Aesthetics and Politics in Medicean Florence (16th-17th centuries)
Term:
Fall 2017
Department:
French
Le Principe de plaisir: savoir, esthétique et politique dans la Florence des Médicis (XVI e -XVII e ) sheds light on long-term transformations in the realm of aesthetics by closely examining the practices, discourses and ideas of a late 16 th century Florentine academy, and of its aristocratic membership. The book principally focuses on understanding the Alterati’s conception of art as the source of a “praise-worthy pleasure” ( lodevole diletto ), analyzing in detail how this representation fits in with the social and political conceptions of the Florentine patricians who belonged to this...Read more
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“Controversy College”: Useful Knowledge, Polemic and Scholarly Institutions in Stuart England
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History
In the mid-seventeenth century, an eclectic group of theologians, pedagogues, amateur physicians and enterprising husbandmen set about to disseminate “Useful Knowledge” throughout England. They used this concept to advocate for education in innovative agricultural practices and knowledge of political economy, while also pressing for new forms of religious devotion. Through my dissertation project, I plan to study how useful knowledge emerged as a pedagogical principle in theological debates in the wake of the Reformation, but authorized plans for England’s material and social improvement by...Read more
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Peripheral Regions, Fragile Governance: Local Economic Development from Latin America
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
City and Regional Planning
Karen Chapple , Ph.D., is a Professor of City and Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. Chapple specializes in regional planning, economic development, and housing. She has most recently published on job creation on industrial land (in Economic Development Quarterly ), regional governance in Peru (in Journal of Rural Studies ), and accessory dwelling units as a smart growth policy (in the Journal of Urbanism ). Her recent book (Routledge, 2014) is entitled Planning Sustainable Cities and Regions: Towards More Equitable Development . In Fall 2015, she launched the Urban...Read more
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Social Networks for the fight against HIV in East African Communities
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Applied Mathematics, Chemical Biology
The high burden of undiagnosed and untreated HIV in sub-Saharan Africa has been a major global health issue for the recent decades. Nature of transmission of HIV, namely, through risky behavior that involve intimate contacts rather than casual contagions, calls for a novel perspective through social network analysis: by building social networks of the local communities, we hope to identify underlying community structures including social hubs and intimate friend zones, which would facilitate us in designing better HIV prevention and intervention schemes. My research will make use of the data...Read more
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The Gift and the Ghost: A Transnational Feminist Reading of the Tohono O'Odham Borderlands
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Interdisciplinary Studies
My project uses critical queer and feminist security studies move beyond the boundaries of “state-centric” theory, and focuses on the liminal sovereignty and citizenship of those who reside in “domestic-dependent nations” in the borderlands as well as their role as mediators between the State and “illegal” migrant bodies. I will examine the white supremicist institutional abjection of migrant and indigenous bodies as the discursive creation of “pathological problem groups” which justify and reproduce border security: while the migrant represents the uncertain spectre of future threat to state...Read more
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Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Psychology
Research has shown that parental socialization practices play a crucial role in children's emotional competence, and that the socialization process is bidirectional (Eisenberg et al., 1998). One important aspect of emotion socialization theorized to benefit children’s emotion understanding is how parents talk about emotions with children (Thompson, 2002). Research in this field is primarily limited to Western populations (Cameron, 2000) and lacks information regarding the effects of cultural factors on parental emotion discussion (ED). The present study addresses this limitation using...Read more
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Augusto Boal: Staging Resistance against the Brazilian Military Dictatorship
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Spanish and Portuguese
My current research centers on the relationship between the Brazilian military dictatorship (1964-1985) and the performance practices (theatrical, musical, literary, and pedagogical) that constituted acts of resistance against the oppressive regime. Through archival research in Brazil, I hope to continue this research by engaging with the work of noted Brazilian playwright and political dissident Augusto Boal. Boal’s theoretical contributions to theater, along with his dramatic production, had an enormous impact in Latin America and other world areas during his lifetime as well as into the...Read more
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A University in Exile: Lianda and Chinese Nationalist Government in World War II
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History, Linguistics
During the World War II, three of Republican China’s best universities, Peking University, Tsinghua University, and Nankai University were forced to abandon their home campuses in Beijing (then Beiping) and Tianjin, as they were occupied by Japanese troops. They migrated together to the southwestern hinterland and merged to form the National Southwest Associated University (Lianda). Convening the country’s best scholars, the university was also widely acclaimed to be the “bastion of democracy” in Nationalist China, holding up its spirit of free inquiry and liberal education inherited from the...Read more

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