Current Winners

Manuscript Mini-Conference Grants

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The Pleasure Principle: Knowledge, Aesthetics and Politics in Medicean Florence (16th-17th centuries)
Term:
Fall 2017
Department:
French
Le Principe de plaisir: savoir, esthétique et politique dans la Florence des Médicis (XVI e -XVII e ) sheds light on long-term transformations in the realm of aesthetics by closely examining the practices, discourses and ideas of a late 16 th century Florentine academy, and of its aristocratic membership. The book principally focuses on understanding the Alterati’s conception of art as the source of a “praise-worthy pleasure” ( lodevole diletto ), analyzing in detail how this representation fits in with the social and political conceptions of the Florentine patricians who belonged to this...Read more
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Peripheral Regions, Fragile Governance: Local Economic Development from Latin America
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
City and Regional Planning
Karen Chapple , Ph.D., is a Professor of City and Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. Chapple specializes in regional planning, economic development, and housing. She has most recently published on job creation on industrial land (in Economic Development Quarterly ), regional governance in Peru (in Journal of Rural Studies ), and accessory dwelling units as a smart growth policy (in the Journal of Urbanism ). Her recent book (Routledge, 2014) is entitled Planning Sustainable Cities and Regions: Towards More Equitable Development . In Fall 2015, she launched the Urban...Read more
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Making Gender: Sex, Body, and Norm in American Medicine and Science
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History
Sandra Eder is an Assistant Professor in the History Department at the University of California, Berkeley, where she teaches courses in the history of gender and sexuality in the U.S. and the history of medicine and science. Her research focuses on gender and sexuality in medicine and science, clinical practices and patient records, and the science of happiness. As a historian of gender and medicine, she aspires to blend the insights of gender studies and the history of medicine to contextualize and historicize the origins of our modern concept of “gender” in American biomedicine. Before...Read more
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Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History
Rebecca Herman is assistant professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley where her research and teaching explore the intersections between international and domestic politics in the Americas. Before joining the faculty at Berkeley, she taught as assistant professor of International Studies and Latin American Studies at the University of Washington. Professor Herman has received grants and fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the Mellon Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Council on Library and Information Resources. She earned her BA from Duke...Read more
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Sovereignty and Popular Politics in Late Mughal Delhi
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History
Dr. Abhishek Kaicker is a historian of early modern South Asia. He received his PhD in history from Columbia University in 2014. He is broadly interested in questions of urban space, culture and politics at the dawn of the modern world. At Berkeley, he teaches undergraduate courses on the long history of the Indian subcontinent; graduate courses on the eighteenth century in Indian history; and on the city across Eurasia in the eighteenth century. Sovereignty and Popular Politics in Late Mughal Delhi, 1707-39 is concerned with the language and practice of popular politics on the streets of...Read more
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The Right of Sovereignty: Jean Bodin on Sovereignty, Law, and the Foundations of International Order
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Political Science
Daniel Lee is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley and specializes in political theory, the history of political thought, and jurisprudence. His research concerns the Reception of Roman law in later medieval and early modern political thought and its influence on modern doctrines of sovereignty, statehood, and rights. His first book, Popular Sovereignty in Early Modern Constitutional Thought (Oxford, 2016), locates the juridical origins of modern popular sovereignty doctrines in the legal science of the Roman law tradition and investigates the use...Read more
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Geoaesthetics in the Little Ice Age: Sensorium, Sacrament, and Artistic Cultures in Braj, India ca. 1550–1850
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History of Art
Rivers of love. Alchemic mountains. Bowers of stone. Geoaesthetics in the Little Ice Age takes the reader on a journey through the enchanted world of Braj, the primary pilgrimage site in India for worshippers of the Hindu god Krishna. According to scriptural texts, Braj is the site where Krishna lives eternally. Consequently, each stone, river, and tree in the pilgrimage center is considered effervescent with vibrant energy. This extraordinary place-oriented theology based on venerating the natural environment, however, found articulation only after the commencement of the Little Ice Age (ca...Read more
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Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don't Know It
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
English
Susan Schweik is Professor of English at the University of California at Berkeley, where she has worked since 1984. She is the author of The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (NYU, 2009) and A Gulf So Deeply Cut: American Women Poets and the Second World War (1991) and is completing a book tentatively titled Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don’t Know It; this book will be the subject of the IIS book manuscript workshop. She served as Associate Dean of Arts and Humanities at UCB from 2007-2015 and will return to that position in Fall 2017. She is a recipient of...Read more
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Moche Murals and Archaeo-Art History: Image Studies in Ancient Peru
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History of Art
Lisa Trever is assistant professor of History of Art at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research examines the arts and visual cultures of ancient to modern South America in cross-disciplinary perspective, drawing on methods and theories of art history, history, archaeology, and social anthropology. She holds a PhD in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University; a masters degree in Art History from the University of Maryland, College Park; and a bachelor’s degree in Archaeological Studies from Yale University. At Berkeley, she is a faculty affiliate of the...Read more
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Strange Likeness: Description and Modernism
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
English and Comparative Literature
In her book project “Strange Likeness: Description and Modernism” Dora Zhang traces a transformation and revaluation of literary description in Anglo-French fiction around the turn of the twentieth century, when many modernist writers denounced the descriptive “excesses” of the nineteenth century realist novel. The modernist dissolution of traditional plot structures is well known, but, because theories of the novel have been centered on elements of narration (i.e., the telling of events or actions), critics have largely ignored the functions of description. Zhang argues that an analysis of...Read more