Current Winners

Undergraduate Merit Scholarship

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Comparison of Kleptoparasitic Spider Communities in Costa Rica and Hawaii
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Molecular Environmental Biology
Little is known about how the web architecture of host spiders affects the foraging strategies of kleptoparasitic Argyrodes spiders. In order to understand the nature of this trophic interaction, I will collaborate with arachnologists from all over the world, and travel to Costa Rica to collect and observe Argyrodes and their hosts, Nephila clavipes. Upon bringing them back to UC Berkeley, I will use DNA sequencing techniques to compare the host diet to that of the kleptoparasite, and compare these results to my work on Hawaiian kleptoparasitic interactions. The Hawaiian host spider,...Read more
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Religious Crisis in Anglo-Saxon England
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
English
The Anglo-Saxon period was a time of profound religious whiplash in which the religious landscape of England was repeatedly rewritten, primarily by means of conquest and cultural hegemony. The question of how, in light of this instability, Anglo-Saxons reconciled themselves with Christianity, ultimately making it the prevailing cultural mode, is a question almost exclusively asked and answered on a sociological level. In writing my thesis, I seek to challenge this approach, and the resultant view of Anglo-Saxon religiosity as universal, by identifying individual religious disjuncture in Anglo...Read more
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Crafting “Worker’s Art”: Migrant Labor, Collective Authorship, and Artist Village in Post-Mao China
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History of Art
The notion of “worker’s art” or “collective production” has been central to the discourse of modern Chinese revolutions. Against the backdrop of post-Mao market reforms in 1979, however, the new socioeconomic regime began to challenge old forms of collective authorship, rendering complexities to the meanings of “worker’s art.” As millions of rural workers flooded into cities to earn a living, migrant artists came to find their roles oscillating between a collective group making a utopic claim and individual “art workers” surviving in a quasi-market economy. With “worker’s art” being...Read more
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Ancient Graffiti and Emulation of Moche Religious Wall Paintings
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
History of Art
Prior investigations on Moche visual culture (ca. 250–850 CE) of ancient north coastal Peru have largely been limited in scope to the analysis of fineline iconographies masterfully painted on pottery vessels. Due to connoisseural interests in decorative ceramics and metallurgy, other artforms are less often examined. Perhaps due to their informal nature, ancient graffiti incised onto the adobe walls of surviving ceremonial structures are seldom considered. In my honors thesis in History of Art, I depart from modern connotations of ancient graffiti as transgressive, subversive or irrelevant...Read more
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Maoist Discourse, Visual Media, and Everyday Life in the Cultural Revolution
Term:
Spring 2017
Department:
Comparative Literature
Given a tradition of quotation literature in Chinese history, this research will start from an examination of a literary lineage from Maozadong Thought to Quotations from Chairman Mao, and to keyword slogans during the Cultural Revolution. Keyword slogan takes advantage of its simplistic form to convey a revolutionary obligation to the mass. The meaning of quotations changes when the mass re-utter Mao’s words out of original theoretical context. With a consideration of J.L. Austin’s “performative utterance” in How to Do Things With Words, keyword slogan is similarly able to take on a...Read more

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