Past Winners

Manuscript Mini-Conference Grants

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Gendered Imperium: Founding Men and Women in the Discourse of Imperial Power from Rome through Early Byzantium
Term:
Fall 2012
Department:
History of Art
My book project recovers the dynamic yet central role gender played in the conceptualization of Roman imperial rule (the imperium) before and after the Christianization of the Roman Empire. Most writings about the Roman Empire tend to focus on emperors, perpetuating the notion of the Empire as a military monarchy in which women mattered little. Those scholars who study imperial women rarely venture outside the chronological framework of a particular dynasty. These two approaches have reinforced the notion that women exercised little more than a dynastic role within the empire. The literary...Read more
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Multiethnic Coalitions in Africa: Business Financing of Opposition Election Campaigns
Term:
Spring 2010
Department:
Political Science
Why are politicians able to form electoral coalitions that bridge ethnic divisions in some countries and not others? This book answers this question by presenting a theory of pecuniary coalition building in multi-ethnic countries governed through patronage. Focusing on sub-Saharan Africa, the book explains how the relative autonomy of business from state-controlled capital affects political bargaining among opposition politicians in particular. While incumbents form coalitions by using state resources to secure cross-ethnic endorsements, opposition politicians must rely on the private...Read more
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Co-Motion: Co-Formations, Co-Productions, and the Planetary in Feminist and Queer Alliances
Term:
Spring 2014
Department:
Gender and Women's Studies
Paola Bacchetta is Associate Professor of Gender and Women's Studies at University of California, Berkeley. She is on the Executive Committee of the University of California-wide Center for New Racial Studies. She is former Coordinator of the Gender Consortium at Berkeley. She is also former Director and current Advisory Board Chair of the Beatrice Bain Research Group, Berkeley’s research center on gender. She is an Advisory Board Member of Berkeley’s Center for the Comparative Study of Right-Wing Movements and Center for the Study of Sexual Cultures. Professor Bacchetta is the author or...Read more
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Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America
Term:
Spring 2011
Department:
Ethnic Studies
Catherine Ceniza Choy is an Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History , published by Duke University Press and co-published by Ateneo de Manila University Press in 2003. Empire of Care explored how and why the Philippines became the world’s leading exporter of professional nurses. She has published essays on international adoption in the Journal of American-East Asian Relations, International Korean Adoption: A Fifty Year History of Policy and Practice , The American...Read more
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Taste and Design: Communicating Utility, Meaning, and Aesthetics
Term:
Spring 2014
Department:
Architecture
Galen Cranz, Ph.D. Sociology, University of Chicago, certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, has taught social & cultural processes, including research methods, in architecture at Berkeley & Princeton. Several POEs conducted by her classes have been published. She co-edited Environmental Design Research: The Body, The City, and the Buildings In between (2011), wrote The Chair: Rethinking Culture, Body and Design (2004 EDRA Achievement Award) and The Politics of Park Design: A History of Urban Parks in America, which helped her win three park design competitions. Kellogg National...Read more
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Archiving Fandom: Media Users and Digital Cultural Memory
Term:
Spring 2014
Department:
Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies
Abigail De Kosnik is an Assistant Professor in the Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM) and the Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, and is an affiliated faculty member of Gender & Women’s Studies. She researches popular media, particularly digital media, film and television, and fan studies. She is particularly interested in how issues of feminism, queerness, ethnicity, and transnationalism intersect with new media studies and performance studies. She has published a number of essays in edited collections and journals such as Cinema Journal , Modern Drama , The...Read more
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Ethnography, Literature and National Projects in the Hispanic Caribbea
Term:
Spring 2015
Department:
Spanish & Portuguese
Daylet Domínguez is an assistant professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California Berkeley. She completed her PhD in Spanish at Princeton University in 2013. Professor Domínguez’s teaching and research interests include modern and contemporary Latin American and Caribbean literatures and cultures. She focuses on themes of anthropology, natural history, travel literatures, c ostumbrismo , visual cultures, slavery, nation and imperialism in the nineteenth century. Her articles have been published in Hispanic Review and Revista de Estudios Hispánicos . Her...Read more
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Seasons of Misery: Catastrophe and the Writing of Colonial Settlement
Term:
Spring 2012
Department:
English
Kathleen Donegan joined the Berkeley English Department in 2007, after receiving her Ph.D. in American Studies at Yale University. She specializes in early American literature from the era of exploration to the early Republic, and has a special interest in 17th century colonial settlement. Her current book project, Seasons of Misery: Catastrophe and the Writing of Colonial Settlement , traces a discourse of catastrophe in the reports and relations sent back from England’s nascent New World colonies, and argues that colonial subjectivity emerged from the combination of suffering and violence...Read more
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Territories of the Soul: Ways to Belong in the Black Diaspora
Term:
Spring 2012
Department:
English
Nadia Ellis completed her PhD at Princeton University and joined UC Berkeley's English Department as an Assistant Professor in 2008. She specializes in twentieth-century literature and culture of the African Diaspora, an interest that began with--and continues to be grounded in--her studies of that region of cultural, racial, and diasporic nexus: the Caribbean. She teaches courses on black literature, the urban postcolonial, and queer sexual cultures, and is currently completing her first book—on black diaspora and belonging. Essays and reviews on such topics as queerness in dancehall music;...Read more
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Losing the Human: The Rise of Juridical Humanity in Colonial Egypt
Term:
Spring 2011
Department:
Rhetoric
A former lawyer, Samera Esmeir recived her Ph.D. in Law and Society from New York University. She is currently working on her book manuscript wich is an historical study of Egypt under British rule and a theoretical exploration of the juridicalization of the "human". Entitled Juridical Humanity , this manuscript investigates the role played by the violence of imperial colonialism in the constitution of "universal humanity," and in inscribing the human as the teleology of modern law. She has been also working on other research projects that focus on the contemporary Middle East, and...Read more
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Special Relationships: Israel, Palestine, and U.S. Imperial Culture
Term:
Spring 2014
Department:
Ethnic Studies
Keith P. Feldman is an assistant professor in the department of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley, and is an affiliated faculty with the Designated Emphasis in both Critical Theory and Women, Gender, and Sexuality. His research theorizes and narrates relationships between U.S. imperial culture, West Asia, North Africa, the Arab and Muslim worlds, and Israel/Palestine. His writing has appeared in a variety of venues, including CR: New Centennial Review, Comparative American Studies, MELUS, ALIF, postmodern culture, Comparative Literature Studies, Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography, Theory...Read more
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War and the Political Imagination in Sierra Leone
Term:
Spring 2012
Department:
Anthropology
Mariane Ferme joined Berkeley's Anthropology Department in 1993, and since then has taught, too, at the University of Cambridge, the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (Paris), and at the Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Her longterm research in Sierra Leone (West Africa) has focused on gender and material culture, violence and political cultures, electoral politics, and transitional justice. Her 2001 book, The Underneath of Things: Violence, History and the Everyday in Sierra Leone (U of California Press)...Read more
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James Joyce and Walter Benjamin and the Matter of Modernity
Term:
Spring 2014
Department:
English
Catherine Flynn is Assistant Professor in the Department of English where she teaches British and Irish modernist literature. She is a native of Ireland and came to the United States in 2002 to pursue a PhD in Comparative Literature at Yale University. Previously, she practiced as an architect in Ireland and in Vienna, Austria; she has a B.Arch. from University College Dublin. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University’s Introduction to the Humanities Program from 2009 to 2012. She has published articles on James Joyce, Walter Benjamin, Bertolt Brecht, Franz Kafka, Marxist literary...Read more
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Sounds of Vacation: Cross-Caribbean Perspectives on Music and Sound
Term:
Spring 2016
Department:
Music
Jocelyne Guilbault is Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Music Department of the University of California, Berkeley. Since 1980, she has done extensive fieldwork in the French Creole- and English- speaking islands of the Caribbean on both traditional and popular music. Informed by a postcolonial perspective, she has published several articles on issues of representation, aesthetics, the cultural politics of West Indian music industries, multiculturalism, and world music. She is the author of Zouk: World Music in the West Indies (1993), and Governing Sound: the Cultural Politics of Trinidad’s...Read more
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Global Health is Global Justice
Term:
Spring 2012
Department:
Public Health
Dr Juan Garay, the author of "Global Health is Global Justice" is a physician, originally from Spain, who specialized in Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Public Health and Epidemiology. He worked during the 1980s and 90s as a medical officer in rural districts of West and Southern Africa, and gradually moved to designing and evaluating public health programmes in the fields of Primary Health Care, malaria and AIDS control, Chagas eradication and humanitarian health aid. Over the last decade, he has been coordinating the work of the European Union in health policies and programmes with...Read more

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