Past Winners

Allan Sharlin Memorial Award

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Term:
Fall 2012
Department:
Sociology
Laws restricting collaboration between local police and federal immigration agencies (also known as “sanctuary city” policies) reemerged after 9/11, concurrent with the federal restructuring of immigration enforcement. Across the U.S., local communities pushed back against the post-9/11 rhetoric of immigrant threat and criminality, as well as the federal government’s hawkish immigrant detention and deportation programs. Cities, counties, and even states formally rejected federal initiatives seeking to use local police as key players in immigration enforcement. These jurisdictions resisted the...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2012
Department:
Geography
The global Great Depression of the early 20th century emerged through a complex of social changes, including international credit and commodity bubbles, labor migrations, and liberalized trade and property legislation. Not least among these, however, were changes in land use, particularly intensified and expanded commodity crop production. The period of the Great Depression, then, was marked not just by globalized unemployment and market collapse but also by widespread soil exhaustion and erosion. This dissertation research examines the subsequent international development of community-based...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2010
Department:
History
My dissertation charts the evolution of multi-culturalism as a response to the immigration of former colonial subjects to Britain after World War II. I argue that the introduction of a welfare state during the dissolution of the empire produced an anxiety over community that was displaced into concern for the integration of Commonwealth migrants into local social services. With a government invested in providing basic social services for all citizens, access to those services became the site for debates concerning political citizenship, social belonging, and the status of Britain in a post-...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2014
Department:
Music
My dissertation Formation of Russian Musicology from Sacchetti to Asafyev (1886-1932) explores Russian thought on music in the period leading to the institutionalization of musicology as a scholarly discipline. The turn of the 20th century in Russia saw the expansion of writing on music, as established European textbooks and histories were translated and new Russian ones were written. It was a time of rapid assimilation of European music historiography, aesthetics and philosophy, rethought and reacted against in a nationalistic vein. Caught in the midst of many disparate influences – Hanslick...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2012
Department:
History
My dissertation examines British broadcasting, publishing, and film services in Africa to investigate how Britain used the domain of culture to further its imperial endeavor during and after decolonization. In the 1930s British colonial officials introduced broadcasting services, publication bureaus, and film units into Africa under the rubric of colonial development. Radio, film, and mass-produced print represented a cultural project of empire because they shared the ability to spread the English language and British traditions of expression across a vast space cheaply. Over the following...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2013
Department:
History
My dissertation, “‘Feed the World:’ Humanitarian Technologies and British Relief, 1883-1985,” examines the rise of humanitarian aid in the twentieth century. Starting with the famine code in 1883, and the formation of the famine relief camps, the British created systemized methods to determine the parameters for famine relief. Exceeding their colonial origins, these methods became the basis of for humanitarian aid in Europe in the two World Wars, as well as during decolonization. While students of European colonial empires have explored ad-hoc responses to famines in Ireland and India during...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2013
Department:
Anthropology
“Reinventing the Jewish Way: The Jewish Revival Movement in the USSR as a Product of the Late Soviet Period,” focuses on the Jewish revival movement that emerged in the Soviet Union between the 1960s and the late 1980s. This movement was virtually invisible in public space, and the state periodically persecuted its members. To avoid the gaze of the Soviet state, Jews clandestinely gathered in private apartments, where they collectively studied Hebrew, sacred Jewish texts, Jewish history and tradition, celebrated Jewish holidays, and even published samizdat (unofficial) Jewish magazines. Some...Read more
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Term:
AY 2016-17
Department:
History
The term Volksdeutsche has been used since the late nineteenth century to describe ethnic Germans living outside the Reich's borders. In Nazi-occupied Poland and western Soviet Union, German authorities awarded the Volksdeutsche status to individuals of German ancestry and to those who—according to the racial experts—exhibited Aryan racial or cultural traits. As a result, approximately three million Polish citizens arbitrarily received the Volksdeutsche status while the number of Soviet citizens in that category still remains unknown. The Volksdeutsche who chose to remain in both countries...Read more
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Term:
AY 2015-16
Department:
History
My dissertation, "The Army of Democracy:" U.S.-Service Clubs, the Middle Classes, and Twentieth-Century Mexican Politics,” studies the relationship between the middle classes and the one-party dominant state in Mexico. The middle classes were among the intended and actual beneficiaries of the Institutional Revolutionary Party’s (PRI) economic policies. Yet the PRI, which maintained political hegemony for over seven decades, never created an effective middle-class organization, such as it had for peasants and workers. To understand this relationship, I examine the role that transnational...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2010
Department:
Jurisprudence and Social Policy
Seventeenth century English politics witnessed both a pair of civil wars wherein the nature of sovereignty came into question and a growing emphasis amongst political and legal writers on “the rule of law” as - among other things - an ideological commitment to limiting the scope and extent of state violence against individuals. The polemics and legislation of the period and that immediately following it hold a symbolic place in Anglo-American legal and political history as representing a shift from personal rule to the “rule of law,” which came to be understood to require a certain set of...Read more
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Term:
AY 2015-16
Department:
Sociology
My dissertation aims to rethink the connection between politics and criminal justice in post-Mao China. Beginning with Mao’s death, in an attempt to reconstruct the country after the Cultural Revolution’s decade of violent excess, China’s leadership and population inaugurated a “new period” celebrating “order and stability” and repudiating class struggle. Massive reforms formalized political institutions, the economy, and the legal system, including a completely rewritten criminal code and procedure. According to the dominant theoretical tradition in political sociology, rationalization of...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2014
Department:
History
The working title of my dissertation is ‘Freedom Planned: Neoliberalism and the Late Twentieth Century British City.’ My project will chart the end of Britain’s social democratic welfare state in the late 1970s and Britain’s transition to a more globalized, flexible and service orientated economy through Britain’s changing built environment. I am interested particularly in how the changing fabric of British cities reflected, normalized and helped generate new understandings of economic and social life. By taking the built environment as an object of historical study I want to establish a new...Read more
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Term:
Fall 2010
Department:
Sociology
My dissertation traces the consequences of a series of corruption scandals within English East India Trading Company's colonial administration of India in the second half of the 18th century. These scandals were important for two reasons. First, as colonial administrators attempted to escalate local administrative conflicts to include political authorities in London, new actors, many of whom held little concrete knowledge of India, became involved in Company governance. Second, in order to appeal to these new actors, colonial administrators began using abstract political, economic, and social...Read more